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             URBAN JALI

Capturing stories in it's raw element and adding contextual perspective as seen "behind the lens". Through the live platform, "Know Thy Neighbor, Know Thy Story" Urban Jali partners with artists, block associations, merchants and residents in hopes to strengthen communities with each visualization and  shared experience.

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Urban Jali

Jackie Jackson Snatched Coins Off The Top Of The Backboard
04:01

Jackie Jackson Snatched Coins Off The Top Of The Backboard

Former NBA Player and founder of Rucker Park Basketball Tournament, Bob McCullough talks about street ball legend Jackie Jackson and how part of his legacy was wrongfully credited to Earl Manigualt, another street ball legend. This is a debate over a list of basketball phenoms that were born in New York City and balled in the 60s and 70s. While movies were made about some of these greats and hoop dreams there is not much video or documentation of any of this. In some ways it make the legacy more interesting but also leaves room for inaccuracies and misinformation. Similarly to the terrible reality that video footage of Sugar Ray Robinson does not exist we are not able to fully appreciate the greatness. To go even further, the deliberate action of destroying evidence of African and Native American tribes contribution to the culture of Human kind and before is detrimental. The recording of Sugar Ray Robinsons fights were either destroyed or intentionally not performed, yet he is the record holder for the most about of bouts, wins and range of weight categories. I know this seems off-topic of Jackie Johnson and Earle Manigualt. I will let that part of the basketball legacy be spoken by Mr Mccullough. He was there and is a jaliyaa in his own right. My main point is that it is important for people to document their own stories in order for legacies to live on in a way that it is properly told. Thank you Mr. McCullough and New York Knicks for making this happen. #ruckerpark #ruckerbasketball #bobmccullough #newyorkknicks #urbanjali
THOUGHT OF KOBE 2020 - Urban Jali
06:36

THOUGHT OF KOBE 2020 - Urban Jali

I was looking forward to what Kobe Bryant was going to do next. After his retirement from the NBA, I awaited to see what new milestone he would achieve as a father, as a commentator possibly with his own show. Really, I did. So many other icons that provided important gems to our society have passed away and God bless their souls. But when the news of the helicopter crash that killed 9 people including Kobe Bryant and his oldest daughter transmitted over the airwave of WBLS, I was in utter disbelief and sadness. As a New Yorker, I am a NBA Knick fan holding on to the Patrick Ewing and Charles Oakley era. I never really liked the Lakers post Magic Johnson, Kareem Abdul Jubbar and James Worthy. Shaq was a bully but I love him now. And I woefully regret that my cameraman from the New York Post did not capture the cathartic debate I had with 7-time-NBA-champion Robert Horry in 2008 about why he should give back 2 of his championship rings. During our debate he exclaimed that no other team was tougher than his Lakers and I reminded him of the 2 piece knuckle sandwich that Knick PG, Chris Childs handed to Kobe on a silver platter, like WHAT-what! The chin check was sent to a young Kobe who was spectacular on the court and ran into one major issue off the court. The accusation of rape called his entire team into question and the spotlight shined on Kobe. Fans and critics chose their sides. By the time the accusation was discredited, it seemed like his closest teammates abandoned him. Shaq left the Lakers and Kobe had the team to himself and lots to prove. Post this incident Kobe’s interviews were riddled with very generic answers. I felt like it was extremely difficult for many interviewers to pierce the armor he had around his persona. I’m not the type of fan that only sees good. I watch the overall game and Kobe’s on the court antics were extremely frustrating at times. Many fans glorify his mamba mentality but HE NEVER PASSED THE BALL! Ronmey Turiaf would be wide open directly under the rim and Kobe would dribble, dribble and take the most difficult shot. I’d hold my breath in anguish and the majority of the time he’d make it, or make up for the miss. He won his championships when he started to trust his teammates more and pass the damn ball. But ever since that off-the-court incident, I observed the overall situation and saw a misunderstood person who became guarded and extremely focused. I started to root for him and I watched every match-up against Shaq wishing that he would slam-dunk it on the big man as a statement made. It never happened the way I hoped but even better the two resolved their differences. One of Kobe’s close cousins from the DMV area was part of a college film project that I produced and directed. She would tell me that he and I had a lot in common. She was referring to personalities, character and gifts. I mean aside from that, truth be told my jump-shot had some similarities to the NBA star, nah mean… but I digress. People did say that we looked alike… but I digress. I have conviction and I am dedicated to my craft. Kobe owned being a ‘girl dad’; I own being a ‘boy dad’. I am a loving father. This love has increased to greater strength and determination despite trial and tribulations. I believe that I too have been misunderstood in challenging scenarios. My version of the mamba mentality has been connecting with people and deepening awareness of my inner self. I share the wisdom that comes with it and apply it to everything I do, including parenting. Kobe wrote a children’s book and won an Emmy for it, demonstrating his ability to excel at more than one thing. I am not just a journalist, superb photographer/videographer, writer… my core being enables me to utilize fulfill multiple roles of what may be describe as a Renaissance man. Kobe was and still is inspiration of the similar astrological stars. We share the same birthday. I will not pretend like I knew the brother personally. Many people felt a connection to Kobe for one reason or another. I’ve just shared mine. I definitely did not know John, a man walking the streets during winter with a black coat and no hat to cover his balding head. John greeted me in the commercialism of Times Square. But he did so in a way that felt like we were neighbors. His eyes were sincere. There was absolutely a human connection established and this interview was cathartic for the both of us. That is one of the gifts I enjoy sharing. #kobebryant #kobebryantdaughter #newyork #timessquare #urbanjali #darrylharrison #streetinterview #iamsonewyork #ilovenewyork #2020 #prepandemic
Body Dysmorphia
03:46
Horse Named, Ryder Collapses and Dies Months Later
09:25

Horse Named, Ryder Collapses and Dies Months Later

This is video that I captured of a horse named Ryder that collapsed onto 9th avenue and West 45th street in Hell’s Kitchen, August 10, 2022. It was an interesting display of emotions and perception. By the time I arrived to the scene I had missed the instance when the driver single handedly tried to get the distraught horse onto its feet. The video of that instance is disturbing. But then again, that may be based on my references as someone who is not trained in how to handle animals in a matter such as the one displayed here. I do question if the driver had enough training to handle this situation. Slapping a horse that cannot walk due to heat, exhaustion, eating contaminated food, lack of hydration does seems unreasonable. The body language of the driver seemed to be interpreted as nonchalant, while Ryder struggles to get off the ground. Should he be mindful of his body language? I don’t know… it’s hard to tell what a person is truly thinking, or is it? There was a point when the Ryder looked in my direction, as his tongue hung desperately out the side of his snout and harness… I stared into his eyes and could not fathom the idea of filming that moment. I felt helpless. Kudos to the neighbors who pitched in to aid Ryder, despite their frustration. And kudos to the respondents who apparently did the best they could to take Ryder into safety. Also kudos to those who voiced their opinion and shared this story on other social media platforms for more people to be aware of the latest update on a long debate over the horse n carriage business in NYC. On October 18th, 2022 animal rights advocates and mourners gathered at 9th ave and 45th street to pay respects to the death of Ryder. According to AMNY News, TWU Local 100, the horse carriage union, however, claims that they ensured that Ryder was loved and cared for after being placed at the sanctuary. Non believers are outraged with the horse and carriage industry and have been for a very long time. AMNY reports, “There are no more excuses for allowing carriage horse and worker abuses. Ryder’s death, following his collapse and cover up, exposed the complicity of carriage horse owners and their union allies in industry-wide abuse and corruption. With the whole world watching, they lied about Ryder’s age, they lied about his health, and now they are facing a criminal investigation. But the problem is bigger than one sick, elderly horse who was being worked to death. Over 70% of New Yorkers agree – it’s time for the City Council to take action to end the abuse of all carriage horses in our city. We can’t wait for the next horse to drop dead or crash into Midtown traffic. For better wages without animal abuse, pass this bill now,” Edita Birnkrant, Executive Director of NYCLASS said. #newyork #hellskitchen #horseandcarriage #urbanjali #spotnews #nyc #ryder #peta #horse and carriage #animalrights
Jackie Jackson Snatched Coins Off The Top Of The Backboard
04:01
UrbanJali UrbanJali

Jackie Jackson Snatched Coins Off The Top Of The Backboard

Former NBA Player and founder of Rucker Park Basketball Tournament, Bob McCullough talks about street ball legend Jackie Jackson and how part of his legacy was wrongfully credited to Earl Manigualt, another street ball legend. This is a debate over a list of basketball phenoms that were born in New York City and balled in the 60s and 70s. While movies were made about some of these greats and hoop dreams there is not much video or documentation of any of this. In some ways it make the legacy more interesting but also leaves room for inaccuracies and misinformation. Similarly to the terrible reality that video footage of Sugar Ray Robinson does not exist we are not able to fully appreciate the greatness. To go even further, the deliberate action of destroying evidence of African and Native American tribes contribution to the culture of Human kind and before is detrimental. The recording of Sugar Ray Robinsons fights were either destroyed or intentionally not performed, yet he is the record holder for the most about of bouts, wins and range of weight categories. I know this seems off-topic of Jackie Johnson and Earle Manigualt. I will let that part of the basketball legacy be spoken by Mr Mccullough. He was there and is a jaliyaa in his own right. My main point is that it is important for people to document their own stories in order for legacies to live on in a way that it is properly told. Thank you Mr. McCullough and New York Knicks for making this happen. #ruckerpark #ruckerbasketball #bobmccullough #newyorkknicks #urbanjali
THOUGHT OF KOBE 2020 - Urban Jali
06:36
UrbanJali UrbanJali

THOUGHT OF KOBE 2020 - Urban Jali

I was looking forward to what Kobe Bryant was going to do next. After his retirement from the NBA, I awaited to see what new milestone he would achieve as a father, as a commentator possibly with his own show. Really, I did. So many other icons that provided important gems to our society have passed away and God bless their souls. But when the news of the helicopter crash that killed 9 people including Kobe Bryant and his oldest daughter transmitted over the airwave of WBLS, I was in utter disbelief and sadness. As a New Yorker, I am a NBA Knick fan holding on to the Patrick Ewing and Charles Oakley era. I never really liked the Lakers post Magic Johnson, Kareem Abdul Jubbar and James Worthy. Shaq was a bully but I love him now. And I woefully regret that my cameraman from the New York Post did not capture the cathartic debate I had with 7-time-NBA-champion Robert Horry in 2008 about why he should give back 2 of his championship rings. During our debate he exclaimed that no other team was tougher than his Lakers and I reminded him of the 2 piece knuckle sandwich that Knick PG, Chris Childs handed to Kobe on a silver platter, like WHAT-what! The chin check was sent to a young Kobe who was spectacular on the court and ran into one major issue off the court. The accusation of rape called his entire team into question and the spotlight shined on Kobe. Fans and critics chose their sides. By the time the accusation was discredited, it seemed like his closest teammates abandoned him. Shaq left the Lakers and Kobe had the team to himself and lots to prove. Post this incident Kobe’s interviews were riddled with very generic answers. I felt like it was extremely difficult for many interviewers to pierce the armor he had around his persona. I’m not the type of fan that only sees good. I watch the overall game and Kobe’s on the court antics were extremely frustrating at times. Many fans glorify his mamba mentality but HE NEVER PASSED THE BALL! Ronmey Turiaf would be wide open directly under the rim and Kobe would dribble, dribble and take the most difficult shot. I’d hold my breath in anguish and the majority of the time he’d make it, or make up for the miss. He won his championships when he started to trust his teammates more and pass the damn ball. But ever since that off-the-court incident, I observed the overall situation and saw a misunderstood person who became guarded and extremely focused. I started to root for him and I watched every match-up against Shaq wishing that he would slam-dunk it on the big man as a statement made. It never happened the way I hoped but even better the two resolved their differences. One of Kobe’s close cousins from the DMV area was part of a college film project that I produced and directed. She would tell me that he and I had a lot in common. She was referring to personalities, character and gifts. I mean aside from that, truth be told my jump-shot had some similarities to the NBA star, nah mean… but I digress. People did say that we looked alike… but I digress. I have conviction and I am dedicated to my craft. Kobe owned being a ‘girl dad’; I own being a ‘boy dad’. I am a loving father. This love has increased to greater strength and determination despite trial and tribulations. I believe that I too have been misunderstood in challenging scenarios. My version of the mamba mentality has been connecting with people and deepening awareness of my inner self. I share the wisdom that comes with it and apply it to everything I do, including parenting. Kobe wrote a children’s book and won an Emmy for it, demonstrating his ability to excel at more than one thing. I am not just a journalist, superb photographer/videographer, writer… my core being enables me to utilize fulfill multiple roles of what may be describe as a Renaissance man. Kobe was and still is inspiration of the similar astrological stars. We share the same birthday. I will not pretend like I knew the brother personally. Many people felt a connection to Kobe for one reason or another. I’ve just shared mine. I definitely did not know John, a man walking the streets during winter with a black coat and no hat to cover his balding head. John greeted me in the commercialism of Times Square. But he did so in a way that felt like we were neighbors. His eyes were sincere. There was absolutely a human connection established and this interview was cathartic for the both of us. That is one of the gifts I enjoy sharing. #kobebryant #kobebryantdaughter #newyork #timessquare #urbanjali #darrylharrison #streetinterview #iamsonewyork #ilovenewyork #2020 #prepandemic
Body Dysmorphia
03:46